Mary Ann Barry - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage



Posted by Mary Ann Barry on 9/18/2019

No one wishes to go bankrupt, but it sometimes happens. When you understand that bankruptcy is not the end of your financial journey, you will have enough strength to start all over. It can be an opportunity to move forward and develop a better, personal financial plan.

Taking the right step is a good measure against any other round financial problem that may arise later. You will be adequately fortified against any form of financial embarrassment if you take the right step. Here are the steps to take to repair your credit card after bankruptcy. 

Repair your credit

Bankruptcy will create a lot of unwanted remarks on your credit. Situations like missed payment, overdrawn credit limit will show on your file. The fact is, some of these negative remarks should fall off once the financial distress is over. Updating your information may be delayed by the creditors, thereby impeding your efforts of rebuilding your credit card. Therefore, the first step to take after bankruptcy is to clean up your credit card.

Get a secured credit card 

Your target after completing a bankruptcy is to build better credit. It is crucial that you open a credit account that you can use to improve your score steadily. Most credit card providers approve secured credit cards readily.

Diversify with loans 

The right step to having a better credit is to go for a smaller loan that will be easy to pay back. In most cases, the loan is small, and you can use it for making essential purchases, repairing of homes, and investment. This move enables you to pay off your debt without any hassle and at the same time, build a better financial outlook. 

Irrespective of the type of loan you choose, try always to pay the bills early every month. After repaying what you owe, you can then consider taking another loan to enable you to keep diversifying and creating a good payment history in your credit file. 

Keep an eye on your credit to monitor your progress 

Monitoring your credit after bankruptcy is essential as it helps you to keep watch on your credit score. The credit monitoring service and ID theft prevention will help you in this regard. 

When you sign up for a credit monitoring service, you will be able to know your financial activities affect your credit score. You will also be able to make better decisions once your credit has improved enough to qualify you for an auto loan.




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Posted by Mary Ann Barry on 8/28/2019

One of the most critical aspects of your financial state, when you’re buying a home, is that of your credit score. Credit scores take your entire economic history into account. That means every missed payment, every account opened, and that three-digit number represents every debt you owe. Once you obtain your credit score and assess your finances, if you realize your score needs help, you may feel desperate. The good news is that you’re not helpless. There are plenty of things that you can do to raise your credit score in a short time to increase your chances of getting a better rate on a loan for your home purchase. Read on for some tips on how to improve your credit score.



Keep An Eye On Your Credit Card Balances


One of the most impactful factors on your credit score is how much debt you have. How much debt you have versus how much available credit you have is a significant factor in your score. If you pay your balances in full each month, that’s great. Keep in mind that even if you do pay off your balances that monthly balance amount affects your score as well. Paying off your outstanding credit card balances will have a positive effect on your score.


Remember Some Debt History Is Good


Once you pay off a car or home loan, it can be tempting to want these accounts removed from your credit history. When you’re getting a home loan, the lender wants to know that you’re reliable. If you can show that you have responsibly paid off other loans that can only be a positive thing for you and your credit score. Don’t be so quick to remove old accounts that have been paid off from your report. 


Pay On Time


If you pay your bills on time continuously, it can only bring your score up. If our rating needs help, this could be the most critical thing that you can do to raise your score.


Keep Your Payments Equal Over Time


Keeping your payments equal means that you shouldn’t start charging more than you usually would. You also shouldn’t begin to make lower payments than you have been. Keeping your spending and payments consistent can help you to raise and maintain a good credit score.


If you know you’ll be purchasing a home soon; you should check your credit score. If you’re not close to heading out on the home search, you can pull back a bit. While you always want to maintain good credit health, you shouldn’t be so focused on your credit score that you forget about other things like saving for a downpayment. Know that your credit score is essential in buying a home, but understand that there are many moving parts when it comes to buying a home. 





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Posted by Mary Ann Barry on 7/5/2017

If you’re hoping to buy a home in the near future, there are a number of financial factors you’ll need to consider.

One of the factors that all lenders will consider when determining whether or not to approve you for a mortgage is credit score.

In this article, we’ll lay out the minimum and ideal credit scores that are needed for getting approved for a home loan.

Determining Your Score

As you may guess, credit reporting is a complicated business. There are three main reporting companies that lenders use to determine your credit: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. These companies largely collect the same data about your finances, but can have minor variations. Lenders will take these scores and use the median or middle score to determine your credit rating.

Thanks to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, Americans have the ability to confirm the accuracy of their reports.

If you want to find your credit score, there are a number of online reporting agencies that will show you your report for free on an annual or monthly basis.

Minimum credit scores

Depending on the type of loan you’re applying for and which lender you are pursuing, minimum credit scores vary.

For those seeking first-time homeowner (FHA) loans, you’ll need a credit score of at least 580 to qualify for a 3.5% down payment. A score lower than this amount and you will need to put at least 10% down.

Since FHA loans are insured by the government, you are more likely to be approved if you have a low or “poor” or “bad” credit score (usually anywhere from 300 to 650).

Another type of loan that could help people with low credit is offered by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs. These loans, known as VA loans, are guaranteed, in part, by the government. However, the loans are still approved and distributed by lenders who all have varying minimum credit requirements. A good benchmark is that you’ll need a score of at least 620 to be approved.

Minimum isn’t ideal

While you may get approved for a loan with a low credit, this isn’t always a reason to celebrate.

Lenders use your credit score, among other things, to help determine the interest rate of your loan. A lower score often means a higher interest rate.

While 1 or 2 percent can seem like a small number, it can mean paying tens of thousands of dollars more in interest over the span of a thirty-year loan.

To illustrate the importance of one percent, consider the following. If you owe $200,000 on a home and intend to pay it over 30 years, you will pay $103,000 in interest at 3% and $143,000 at 4% - that’s a difference of $40,000.

Rather than shooting for the minimum credit score, a better approach would be to build credit while saving for a down payment. Someone with a credit score of 740 or higher will be seen by most mortgage lenders as an ideal person to lend to.

Of course, life doesn’t always allow for the ideal situation. So, do your best to save and build credit, and be sure to shop around for the best rates when you’re ready.





Posted by Mary Ann Barry on 1/27/2016

Did you know your credit score is always changing? Your credit score could be one number on one day and a different figure the next and even vary from one credit reporting agency to the next. Your credit score also known as your FICO score is based on the information contained in your credit record. Since your credit file is always changing so is your score. Your credit record changes every time a company you have credit with reports an on-time payment — or more important, a missed payment that's now more than 30 days late. Your score changes each time your credit card balance changes or you apply for new credit. There are three main credit reporting agencies; Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Another factor that could affect your score is that not all lenders report to all agencies. To know your credit score you can pull a free credit report from all three agencies once a year. Look for missing or incorrect information. It is important to get that resolved as soon a possible. Click here for more information on obtaining a free credit report.





Posted by Mary Ann Barry on 7/22/2015

You may think your credit is perfect because you pay your bills on time and never miss a payment. If you are having trouble getting a loan and don't know why, it could be that your credit habits are scaring away lenders. Here are some items that may be lurking in your credit report that are making lenders leery: Multiple Lines of Credit If you have a lot of open credit cards this can be a bad signal to lenders. Lenders see this as an indication that you might be having financial difficulty. Credit Inquiries Lenders also don't like it when you inquire about new lines of credit. Applying for credit can have a negative impact on your credit score. Every time you allow a potential lender to pull up your credit report, your score can take a small hit. Co-Signing a Loan When you co-sign for a loan that dept becomes your debt and shows up on your credit report. Potential lenders look at that debt as yours because you are ultimately responsible for it.  If the person you co-signed for stops paying, pays late, or misses payments, your credit report can be negatively impacted. Making Minimum Payments Lenders who view your credit report don't like to see that you are paying just the minimum payment. If you consistently pay the minimum payment due, it could indicate financial stress or confirm that you are unable to pay off the full balance.